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Two Oklahoma State Womens Basketball Asst. coaches die in plane crash

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Almost 11 years after the OSU Mens Basketball team suffered losses in a plane crash in Colorado. (www.newson6.com) Daha Fazlası...

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caktusjack
Greg Landes 0
Looks like you beat me by about a minute Kyle. Prayers to the families and OSU family.
mackensie
Greg Creedon 0
The FAA report says two killed; news report above says four?
onceastudentpilot
tim mitchell 0
Probably the pilots
pika1000
pika1000 0
4 is correct. Oklahoma State Senator Olin Branstetter (plane was reg to him) and his wife Paula are the other two fatalities.
rooskie13
Dave RIchards 0
4 on board, OSU Head Coach, a Recruiter, and the plane's owner and his wife. Owner, Orin Branstetter, was 82 years old. Hate to speculate, but age could be a factor if he was PIC.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
The plane was as old as the coach.
twinsfd
twinsfd 0
Sad, story
82 year old PIC , that is an accident in the works
arunhn
Arun Nair 0
Their plane went down in Perry County, Ark., also killing the pilot -- 82-year-old former Oklahoma state Sen. Olin Branstetter -- and his wife, Paula. There were no survivors.

Yeah, I Don't want to make any judgement before an NTSB report, but flying a fully loaded PA-28 (four people means, they couldn't' have carried full fuel), by an 82yr old gentlemen, just doesn't seem like a bright idea.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 0
Age is not necessarily a factor. I've known some older pilots, 80 years old still safely flying jets on a regular basis. It boils down to the individual. Msny years ago I had a seaplane instructor, the legendary Bob Mills, he flew the piss out of the airplanes!!!
preacher1
preacher1 0
Not 80 but i'm fixing to be 62. All ya'll young suckers that think you're so full of piss and vinegar, come on and let's just run a "YOU BET YOUR WINGS" course. Most of you will find that instead of being full of piss and vinegar that you are "FULL OF #$%&"
tedtimmons
tedtimmons 0
Hazardous Attitude 4: Invulnerability
'Nah I dont think it'll happen to me!'
Despite the fact that mishaps in aviation do have a rather low percentage probability, many still rest assured on this fact and oft take it for granted. Such attitudes would compromise vigilance and cause pilots to overlook certain issues that they feel are of less importance (going thru checklist twice, good lookout). Remember accidents can happen to ANYONE!

Hazardous Attitude 5: Macho
'Come on! I can do this!'
Pilots have a tendency to show how good they are. Many associate this attitude with males (especially those who display alpha male characteristics) but such an attitude can also happen in females. It occurs when pilots are trying to prove themselves in the wrong way, which often results in taking unnecessary risks.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 0
Easy there old man, you're gonna blow an o ring. They charge more for installation at your age too...
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 0
I didn't mention, but Bob was in his mid 80's still instructing in seaplanes.
rooskie13
Dave RIchards 0
Title of this post is completely wrong. It was the head coach and a recruiter, not two "Asst. coaches".
pika1000
pika1000 0
Thank you Captian Obvious....note that I corrected it later. When the story first came out it was two assistant coaches.
preacher1
preacher1 0
On a just for the heck of it note, there was total confusion at first within the media but coming from law enforcement, as there were 2 plane crashes in the state, about 40 miles apart, and within about 5 minutes of each other. There was this one and also an experimental of some type that the canopy blew off of and caused a crash on departure from the Airport at Clinton AR. Both crashes were in the viewing areas of all 4 Little Rock TV stations and it took about 15-20 minutes to get it all sorted out. 2 were injured in the Clinton crash, not life threatening, and the initial report on this on with the Okla folks was 2 killed.
Ruger9X19
Ruger9X19 0
Prelim report from the FAA http://www.faa.gov/data_research/accident_incident/preliminary_data/media/B_1118_N.txt
mrtrout
mrtrout 0
There was no report of a fire after the crash. Could the loss of power be the result of lack of fuel?
pika1000
pika1000 0
The press conference at OSU today gave a brief description of what authorities were told. I guess authorities were told by a couple of hunters there was a ball of fire near them in the forest they were in.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
What was the weather?
pika1000
pika1000 0
Correction.......One was women's HEAD coach.
AndrewJoyce3
AndrewJoyce3 0
I fly a PA-28R-200, so the only difference between the airplane in the accident and mine is mainly a larger engine and a retractable gear on mine. That being said, I agree with the above poster, "Arun Nair", that the plane more than likely was over max gross.

On my airplane, my useful load is 934 pounds. I don't know their actual weight, but for discussion's sake, let's say the PIC weighed 180, the coach weighed 220, and the two females weighed 130 each. It's about 270 miles between PNC and Little Rock so at 10 gph at bare minimum he would have needed 30 gal, or 180 lbs.

By these crude calculations they are already at mass gross (930 lbs) before factoring in any sort of luggage, plane equipments (charts, headphones, tiedowns etc.), or excess fuel. Obviously we don't have all of the facts at this point, but since there was no report of smoke or fire (http://bit.ly/uGKm7e), I would tend to point towards fuel exhaustion. Terrible tragedy.
FedExCargoPilot
If it was due to fuel, and the weather was VFR, why wouldn't they plan a stop to refuel. I'm not positive, but I don't think they ran out of fuel, unless that's been stated and I misread something.
preacher1
preacher1 0
Well, the article didn't say but the 6pm local news last night said they had been in LittleRock recruiting and had the dad of one of the prospects on there for an interview. That be the case, weather was VFR, cold and light wind, not 40 miles West of KLIT, should have been topped on fuel. Although mention here in this string, none of the reports say anything about fire. Makes you wonder. They are dead; guess we'll wait for the report.
Trunkslammer
Trunkslammer 0
I agree the FAA report will be interesting. Normally, I would quickly question one 82 y.o. pilot, bur Ms Branstetter was a pilot also. Both were reportedly very accomplished, very exerienced pilots. She held some kind of record involving arctic flight apparently. Wonder in what seat she was seated, or if we will know.

The departure from Little Rock and crash site are not very far apart. Fuel starvation that early in the flight?? But, no fire at the crash site...?

The report will be interesting, for sure.
preacher1
preacher1 0
Well, I noticed somewhere that it said they left from Ponca City OK. Maybe he didn't top off at LIT, thinking he had enough for the round. And yeah, don't know if him or her but the plane was the one used in the Artic thing. As you say, the report will be interesting.
pfp217
pfp217 0
I fly an Archer (180) and a Warrior (160), I have never been able to put more than 3 adults in either.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
Terrible & sad.

Two engines and two professional pilots is a rule I learned from a university president a long time ago.
Ruger9X19
Ruger9X19 0
In a lot of cases it seems like the second engine just flies you to the scene of the crash.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
Oh no!
Lvanworkum
Lvanworkum 0
I've heard that before and I strongly disagree
bswinhart
Brian Swinhart 0
Sadly that didnt help them 11 years ago.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
That fully loaded King Air 200 was not flown by a professional crew of two, among other things.
bswinhart
Brian Swinhart 0
I'm curious...what are the 'among other things?'
bswinhart
Brian Swinhart 0
Two professional pilots does NOT make it safer! Buffalo colgan crash, G4 @ hobby that could not fly a glide slope, Challenger @ TEB. ALL of those were PILOTS ERRORS. Not pilot error. All went to training every six months in those airplanes.

Some side notes:
1. Nothing wrong with a fully loaded king air 200. It can fly 4 hours @ max takeoff weight. BJC to SWO is less then a 2 hour flight.
2.There is no terrain higher then BJC enroute to SWO.
3. Pilots errors were the problem. Yes they lost both inverters, BUT they should have know pitch = loss of airspeed (<140 knots) which lead to the development of ice under the wing. A simple glance at a gps, dme, steam gauge would have prevented that accident.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
Have you read the report?
bswinhart
Brian Swinhart 0
FedExCargoPilot
I'm sorry but I don't understand your third point. Where did stalling the plane come in, related to the buffalo crash? That was just a fatigued, poorly trained crew, I don't see how you jumped to this conclusion.
preacher1
preacher1 0
fatigued and poorly trained led to the stall which caused the crash. He pulled the stick back rather than pushing it forward. What in the hell do you want??????????????
bswinhart
Brian Swinhart 0
point #3 was in ref to osu king air crash in 2001. Upon level off they lost ADC (inverter failure) Got disorientated pitched (minimum ice speed is 140 kts, an ATC site showed them @ 86 kts.) and enter graveyard spiral.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
Weather, terrain, system malfunction, etc...
Lvanworkum
Lvanworkum 0
In that case I should give up flight instructing. 2 engines and 2 pilots is absurd, only a rule for part 121 scheduled passenger ops and with more than 19 people.
MANBOI
MANBOI 0
Not for personal/pleasure flights. For business, especially university business, where the coach might have wanted to get from point A to point B to point C and back home on a schedule it's wise to operate in a more professional environment. This is a frequent tragedy in university settings.

In my business we've always used the 2+2 rule when there are some attractive 1+1 options available nearby. I flew a Premier for a year with possibility of operating single pilot but decided I was never going to fly it single pilot so we just switched to an XLS. Studies and accident reports prove two is better than one.
Lvanworkum
Lvanworkum 0
Your point is well taken. I flew both part 135 single pilot IFR single and multi-engine pax charter and part 121 2+2 jets and turboprops. Although these studies may prove this, it all boils down to qualification (situational awareness, emergency procedures, etc.)of the pilot whether 1+1, 1+2 or 2+2 in my humble opinion.
bswinhart
Brian Swinhart 0
I agree with the 'situational awareness, emergency procedures', AND lack of stick and rudder skills. That's a big concern of mine.
Lvanworkum
Lvanworkum 0
Agreed and another, like Colgan in BUF, distractions. In my time flying I had more distractions from the pilot in the other seat than at anytime flying single pilot IFR and I had my share of emergencies in both situations.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 0
What is your line of business?
aetty
soo sad and shocking

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